Letter E

Eagle

U.S. gold coin (1795-1933) with a face value of $10. The basic standard from which all other early U.S. gold coins derive their value, either in fractions or in multiples of an Eagle. 2. Modern U.S. gold and silver bullion and numismatic coins.

Early Release

Coins that are received by a third-party grading service, such as NGC or PCGS, within the first 30 days of the original release date.

Early Strike

Coins that are received by a third-party grading service, such as NGC or PCGS, within the first 30 days of the original release date.

Edge

This is the side of the coin, not the obverse or reverse. The edge is often reeded, plain or lettered.

Extra Fine (EF)

Grading that finds that design elements remain sharp and well-defined.

Extremely Fine (EF)

Slightly circulated coin; very fine hairlines partly obliterated.

EFP (Exchange for Physical)

Off-market trading that allows customers to swap futures and options exposure for an offsetting physical position.

Encapsulated

Indicates that item has been put in a protective plastic holder to safeguard the quality and condition of the item.

ETF (Exchange Traded Fund)

A marketable “paper” security that tracks an index, a commodity, bonds or a basket of assets like an index fund.

Exchange of Futures for Physicals (EFP)

When both parties involved in a futures contract agree to close their positions simultaneously.

Executive Order 6102

Franklin D. Roosevelt issue this order to prevent the hoarding of gold coins and gold bullion. It effectively made holding more than $100 in gold coins. There were exceptions made for artists and jewelers, in addition to holdings of rare gold coins.

Extrusion

A design process that allowed for the creation of objects of a fixed cross-sectional profile. During this process, metal is pushed through a die of the preferred shape.

Eye Appeal

The aesthetic effect that a coin has on its viewer.